American Robins

American Robin
American Robin Eating a Juicy Worm

When we think about American Robins, many of us think, “Spring!” But these very common birds are actually around all year long in much of the United States. While some in the north do migrate southward, in many areas, they stick around if there is food to be found. Their behavior changes in the spring though, which is probably why we tend to notice them more as the days start to lengthen and the weather warms. I thought today, the first day of spring, would be a good day to share some interesting tidbits about robins.

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Birds in the Storm

Fox Sparrow & Northern Cardinal
Fox Sparrow & Northern Cardinal

The most active and interesting days are often not the bright beautiful sunny days but the stormy days when birds are eager to eat as much as they can to keep energy levels high. Yesterday’s storm brought us just such a day with really interesting feathered visitors and activity, so I have pictures and stories to share with you.

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Cardinal Cocktail Hour

Northern Cardinal
Northern Cardinal

Every day as dusk approaches, the Northern Cardinals gather in my yard. A lot of Northern Cardinals. I see between eighteen and twenty-two cardinals most evenings, although twenty-six have shown up for the party in recent weeks. While other birds are winding down their activities and heading back to their preferred snoozing spots for the night, the cardinals are busy filling up on safflower until well after darkness falls. I call it “cardinal cocktail hour.”

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Watching the Birds Rise

White-Throated Sparrow
Early Morning White-Throated Sparrow

There is something very special about watching a new day begin. From quiet darkness, to the first early chirps, to the first few winged visitors, building to the busy activity of dozens, the local birds are a big part of the start of each new day. If you pay attention, you are likely to see patterns in the bird activity in your yard. Every yard is different and every day is different, but this is the pattern I see on a typical winter morning in my yard.

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A Red-Breasted Nuthatch Visit

A Red-Breasted Nuthatch Grabbing a Sunflower Heart From the Feeder
A Red-Breasted Nuthatch Grabbing a Sunflower Heart From the Feeder

This week, we got a fun new feathered visitor to the yard, a Red-Breasted Nuthatch. We regularly see White-Breasted Nuthatches, but this is the first time I’ve ever seen this type of nuthatch in the yard, or anywhere for that matter. In our area, they tend to be a bird occasionally seen in the woods up among the pines rather than at the backyard feeder, but I’m hearing that this year there is an irruption of Red-Breasted Nuthatches.

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Today’s Summer Backyard Birds

Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Birds are always around, one of the things that makes bird watching such an approachable activity. If you don’t have time to watch for awhile, there will be birds to watch when time opens up again. When you do have time for it, it can be a very peaceful and healing activity.

I haven’t done much birding or bird watching in the past month or so. My brother died unexpectedly last month and as often happens when life throws you such things, my daily focus and activities narrowed for awhile. I’ve missed the birds. So today I made a point to go and sit out on my back step and see who might come for a visit.

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Moving a Bird Feeder

Mesh Tube Bird Feeder
Garden Treasures Metal Mesh Tube Bird Feeder

When you feed birds in a big way year-round like I do, you find that there is no perfect year-round arrangement of bird feeders because the bird population in the yard is not stagnant. Some birds seem to stick around with a fairly predictable daily schedule. Others are only here for a season and then migrate out again. Some stop by for a day or two and move on. And yet more discover the bird feeder buffet and become new regulars. Some changes in the bird population don’t make a big impact, while others change the whole dynamic of the yard and I find myself moving feeders around again to find the perfect setup for the new situation.

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