A Ruby-Crowned Kinglet Visit

Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
Ruby-Crowned Kinglet

I found some time to sit out back the other day to watch the birds and got to see some fun feathered visitors, the coolest of which was a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. This little bird spent literally hours flitting up, down and around the leaves and branches of a single tree, hunting for tasty insects. These little guys are FAST and constantly moving and the camera I was using yesterday is not, so I took over two hundred pictures over the course of the afternoon, probably two-thirds of which were of this one bird, just to get a small handful of clear shots. But it was worth it because she was fun to watch.

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Landscaping For Birds: Planning

Backyard Flowers
Backyard Flowers in Last Summer’s Flower Garden

Here in Maryland, we’ve had that little March taste of spring that tries to trick you into going to the local nursery to buy plants. I know that although the local nurseries typically start gearing up around March 1, even now, three weeks later, it is really a month too early to start planting most things around here. So to feed my spring fever and keep myself from impulse purchases, I am instead working on my plans to landscape my yard to create more habitat for birds (as well as look really cool.) Planning such a project is a little intimidating but is also interesting and a lot of fun.

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Twenty-Four Robins: The Birds You Don’t See

Robin
American Robin

One thing I’ve learned watching birds in my backyard is that there is all kinds of activity going on in the yard that I never see. Today, about five-thirty, it was getting dark and I just happened to glance out the front window and realized that it was full of American Robins. I counted twenty-four, although there might have been more in the darkening yard. They were all spread out over the whole front yard doing their quick scurry, pause and listen, scurry again dance, turning over leaves and excavating here and there, looking for choice insects.

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